Club History:

1930s1940s1950s1960s1970s1980s1990s2000s

 

 

1950's

The war had ended, skiing continued to boom. Spruce Peak opened. C.V. Starr brings the world’s best alpine racers
to Mount Mansfield in a series of unprecedented American International Races. MMSC adds to tradition of sending
its best skiers on to the Olympics.

 

 

1950

  • Charlie Blauvelt, as MMSC president, pushed membership to 500.
  • Our club logo was designed by Frank Springer-Miller and all wore their badges proudly.
  •  

    1951

  • A junior program was launched.
  • Pepi Gabl and Karl Fahrner were coaching.
  • All members dressed in green (even painted skis with MMSC logo in yellow).
  • Stowe hosts National Junior Downhill and Slalom Championships.
  •  

    1952

  • Madi Springer-Miller Kraus is named to the 1952 Olympic Team.
  • MMSC hosted National Championships won by Andrea Mead Lawrence and Jack Reddish.
    The race was timed by Bill Hazelett, Dave Partridge, and Jed Prouty.
  • Visitors to Stowe numbered 8,000-15,000.
  • Ted Means became Club President.
  • Local star Lena Gale won Eastern GS final and sent out to Europe to train by C.V. Starr.
  • The millionth skier on the single chair was given a lifetime season pass.
  • Nose Dive is extended to the top of the Nose to give an additional 500 feet of vertical drop for present total
    of just over 2,500 feet. (SMR history timeline)
  •  

    1953

  • MMSC hosts U.S. Nationals.
  • First American International Race held in Stowe under aegis of C.V. Starr.
  •  

    1954

  • Bob Bourdon publishes "Modern Skiing"
  • MMSC celebrates 20th Anniversary, Charlie Daly president.
  • Marvin Moriarty won Eastern Junior Slalom and Combined and he and Billy Woods went west to Junior Nationals.
    Billy was 2nd combined, Skip Bryan was 4th in slalom, but Marvin was injured.
  • The Big Spruce double chair opened on December 18th.
  • Chiharu Igaya was a protégé of C.V. Starr. He was a Dartmouth racer who trained regularly in Stowe.
    He won the Sugar Slalom in the spring.
  •  

    1955

  • Stowe hosts second American International Races. Andreas Molterer of Austria wins men's GS and Slalom.
    Andrea Mead Lawrence wins women's GS and Slalom.
  • MMSC skier and engineer Bill Hazelett develops the "Stowe Binding" - one of the first releasable bindings.
    His children and grandchildren have been successful MMSC racers.
  •  

    1956

  • Spruce House was built as well as the Toll House T-bar.
  • Marvin Moriarty was chosen for the U.S. Olympic Team, the youngest at 17. Two weeks prior to the Olympics,
    he breaks his nkle in the Hannenkahm downhill race at Kitzbuhel, Austria.
  • Jack Shearer and Paul Sutton led 59 on MMSC flight to Europe.
  • Igaya wins silver medal in slalom at 1956 Olympic Games.
  • Gale Shaw became Club president.
  •  

    1957

  • Stowe's rising star, Billy Woods was killed in car accident.
  • The first Stowe Cup was held on Smugglers, Bill Beck was best.
  • Betsy Snite won Eastern Junior Combined.
  • The Mt. Mansfield Company set new rates: $6.50 per day and $150 per season. Club members paid $5.50 per day or $135 per season.
  • The Northern Vermont Junior Council was formed and the MMSC began two day race training clinics.
  • The first useful aluminum ski poles are made by Scott. (Ski/R 1983 p46)
  •  

    1958

  • The MMSC Gala weekend featured the Club downhill on Sterling, torchlight parade and huge party with music by Bob Bourdon.
  • Billy Kidd selected to the National Junior Team.
  • Stowe Cup on Jan. 26-27 is dedicated to Billy Woods.
  • Eastern Championships held February 28 th. First U.S. gondola lift installed at the Wildcat area in New Hampshire. (Amski 1966 p450)
  •  

    1959

  • Sepp Ruschp appointed organizer for 1960 Olympics in Squaw Valley.
  •  

     

    We are continually developing the MMSC history timeline. If you have any interesting MMSC stories, facts or photos, you can contribute,
    or any corrections to the information we have compiled so far, please send to Mike Leach mmsc@teammmsc.org Thank you!